Aging and the Brain: The Proceedings of the Fifth Annual by Charles M. Gaitz M.D. (auth.), Charles M. Gaitz (eds.)

Aging and the Brain: The Proceedings of the Fifth Annual by Charles M. Gaitz M.D. (auth.), Charles M. Gaitz (eds.)

By Charles M. Gaitz M.D. (auth.), Charles M. Gaitz (eds.)

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Additional info for Aging and the Brain: The Proceedings of the Fifth Annual Symposium held at the Texas Research Institute of Mental Sciences in Houston, October 1971

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Progress in preventing and treating some of the disorders in which the nervous system is affected depends in part on understanding the nature of aging processes and the causative roles they play in disease. Since the neurochemistry of aging is a relatively new branch of gerontology, it is still possible to sketch the major contemporary problems and highlights of some present controversies. The general aims of this review are to focus on those major current issues that may determine the direction and rate of future research rather than discuss in detail anyone particular problem in the neurochemistry of aging.

Sample items in incomplete figures task and retention task of Warrington and James (J 96 7). Another type of performance which has received considerable attention in studies of patients with unilateral lesions is facial recognition. The reason for the choice of this rather unusual task as an investigative procedure is that occasionally a patient is encountered whose primary complaint is that he is unable to recognize familiar people by inspection of their faces. This curious disability (called "facial agnosia" or "prosopagnosia ") is generally associated with the presence of disease of the right hemisphere (Hecaen and Angelergues 1962), and it can appear within a context of unimpaired intelligence, vision, and language functions.

Springfield: Thomas, p. 476. A. 1965. Lateralized deficits in complex visual discrimination and bilateral transfer of reminiscence following unilateral temporal lobectomy. Neuropsychologia 3:261. Milner, B. 1962. Laterality effects in audition. In Interhemispheric Relations and Cerebral Dominance. B. ). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, p. 177. M. 1959. The comparative effects of brain damage on the Halstead Impairment Index and the Wechsler-Bellevue Scale. 1- Clin. Psychol. 15:281. L. 1965. Comparative studies of some psychological tests for cerebral damage.

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